Forums General chat Playing Mkv Files Local Network
Viewing 13 posts - 1 through 13 (of 13 total)
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  • #78
    sammy
    18 Posts

    I downloaded and installed the codecs to allow Windows Media Player to read mkv video files to watch directly on the TV on my local network ( BubbleUpnP ). So far, so good. Unfortunately when I right-click on the file I do not get the option “Play To” that I get when reading an MP4 file. These, music and photos work perfectly well, it’s just mkv, but as most of the films I download are in mkv this is a bit of a pain.

    Is there anyway I can get round this or will I just have to accept that Microsoft are being dumb in not natively reading mkv ?

    I wouldn’t normally use WMP but I don’t want to use umpteen different players if one ( even if it’s Microsoft ) will do the job. I had a look at PLEX but I’m not paying for features I won’t use and I not entirely happy about security using it.I also have VLC but streaming to the TV just refuses to work.

    #79
    dave
    17 Posts

    Is this a ‘smart’ TV that you are streaming to? What make/model?

    If so, the renderer will be in the TV, so the codecs are only relevant when playing video on the PC.

    Check your TV manual, to see which video formats it supports playing via DLNA (I’m going to assume it is using DLNA for streaming).

    It sounds like you need to go and read up about how DLNA and streaming works, and how the various elements of a DLNA system interact.

    Also look up transcoding; converting one media format to another (often on the fly), so that you can stream to a device that doesn’t support a particular format (e.g. transcoded MKV to mp4). You might find that WMP has a setting to enable transcoding (in which case, those codecs you loaded will come into use…).

    Also note that MKV and mp4 are container formats, not codec formats; within the container, there will be a codec format. Your playback device needs to understand both the container format and the codec format.

    #80
    sammy
    18 Posts

    @dave Yes, smart TV, Sony Bravia. The TV reads mkv via USB without problems and from my tablet.

    I’ll check the manual but it seems illogical to read mkv on USB but not via DNLA. I’m just after ease of use, right click Play to Bravia , job done !

    I understand that Mkv and MP4 are containers.

    #81
    dave
    17 Posts

    I’ll check the manual but it seems illogical to read mkv on USB but not via DNLA

    Illogical, but very common, sadly.

    It’s a consequence of ‘design by Lego’; bolting together subsystems. The USB media player is one subsystem, and the DLNA renderer is another. They are not integrated at a sensible point.

    Don’t believe me? Read the manual, and check the file support for the different subsystems.

    #82
    sammy
    18 Posts

    Thanks for your replies.

    I’ve checked the Bravia manuals and Mkv is supported by both USB / DNLA.

    Windows Media Player will play ( after installing the codec) Mkv but it will not play them to another device.

    #83
    peter
    5 Posts

    Personally, I would reconsider Plex. I use it a lot and find that it turns the kind of fiddly nightmare that you’re currently experiencing into a foolproof and convenient experience. It does depend how often you want to use it, I guess. Because we use it constantly, the server is always running and we have the client installed everywhere it could be needed. If you’re only going to use it very occasionally, I can see that the initial set up process and then having to start up the server each time you use it could be less worthwhile.

    I don’t think you’d have to pay for it at all. The free version is massively capable and the “Plex Pass” that you have to pay for is only necessary for some quite niche features.

    As for security, I don’t see any reason to be too paranoid. What exactly concerns you? It does have the option of setting up external streaming but that’s easy to disable in the settings so that it only runs on your local network behind your router’s firewall. You could also, if you wanted to, stop it gathering media data from websites.

    #84
    luke
    10 Posts

    My brain hurts with all this streaming terminology. I have a Samsung tv and a synology nas box. As far as I am aware,the NAS box can transcode but I don’t know how to set this up or if it is set up out of the box.

    However I do know that my TV can access the NAS box but for some reason it can not play all the video formats I have on the NAS box.

    I just don’t know where to begin with this transcoding subject.

    #85
    dave
    17 Posts

    I’ve checked the Bravia manuals and Mkv is supported by both USB / DNLA.

    Okay. What codec format do these MKV files contain? You might try installing MediaInfo; it is very good at identifying the properties of media files.

    Out of curiosity, were the USB and DLNA support lists identical?

    Back to your OP; where does BubbleUPnP fit into this? Are you using BubbleUPnP as a DMC, instructing WMP acting as a DMS to stream to your TV acting as a DMR? Or are you using WMP as DMC and DMS?

    Can you install apps on the Sony?

    Google and the Synology manual should help…

    • This reply was modified 3 weeks ago by  dave.
    #87
    sarah
    13 Posts

    I don’t fully understand transcoding and the other terminologies.

    Does the device that holds the media/video do the magic and then stream to the TV?

    Or does the TV do the converting/transcoding, or can it be a mix of both?

    #88
    dave
    17 Posts

    Does the device that holds the media/video do the magic and then stream to the TV?

    Yes: the media server identifies that the renderer cannot handle the original format, and converts (transcodes) it into a format the renderer has declared it can handle.

    It’s not a trivial processing task, so low-end servers may not be able to do it.

    #89
    sarah
    13 Posts

    Allegedly my NAS box is supposed to be capable. I just have not been able to work it out.

    #90
    dave
    17 Posts

    @sarah “Capable” might mean that it has the necessary software but not necessarily that it has the actual processing power to deal with transcoding a good quality video file on the fly. It depends an awful lot on the input and output codecs and the quality/bitrate. Often you’ll see a certain NAS being described as capable of transcoding, say, 720p but not full HD. Even then, given that it’s always a rough estimate depending on all kinds of factors beyond resolution, I think it’s safe to assume that the manufacturers are leaning towards optimistic assessments that make their boxes look more capable than they are in practice.

    The help files for Plex suggest a Passmark score of at least 1000 for full HD transcoding. It’s a common CPU benchmark and you can look up your processor’s score online. Some hardware can be faster with certain codecs but that hardware acceleration tends to be very fussy about codec.

    #175
    sarah
    13 Posts

    Yes: the media server identifies that the renderer cannot handle the original format, and converts (transcodes) it into a format the renderer has declared it can handle.

    I’ve checked again and confirmed that my settings were correct with my NAS media server. Or, I think the settings are correct. However I still can not get certain media formats to play on the TV. Namely mkv files.

    Maybe I haven’t quite worked out how to get the NAS box to convert/transcode the files and I only have it set up so that the TV can access the NAS box but has to do all the work itself.

    One little task at a time.

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